Kara Walker's "A Subtlety" at the Domino Sugar Factory

The last weekend of Kara Walker's "A Subtlety" at Williamsburg's Domino Sugar Factory snuck up on me. Since seeing her amazing exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum a few years ago, her name has always meant a must visit for us. 

You've most likely seen images online of the gigantic female Sphinx made of sugar and the smaller boys/attendants surrounding her throughout the massive Domino Sugar storage shed. These images don't prepare you for the exhibit in the flesh. When you approach the building you notice the sickly sweet smell. Once inside, the odor is everywhere. The floors are sticky with sugar and molasses.

I tried to watch where I stepped, but I couldn't keep my eyes off of the hulking kerchief-topped figure gleaming at the far end of the shed.

Looking from the entrance, Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Looking from the entrance, Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

As I approached her, I  stopped to examine the mute boys holding baskets. Some of them had melted in the heat. Others were still intact - innocent and alarming.

One of the boy attendants, Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

One of the boy attendants, Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

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Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

CLICK for LARGER VERION on FLICKR Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

CLICK for LARGER VERION on FLICKR Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

Kara Walker "A Subtlelty"

I left my D700 at home and brought my new Sony A6000 with the Sony 35mm f1.8 OSS lens to the exhibit. The small Sony was a joy to use in this type of environment. I continue to be impressed with this little beast and it's really making me question my continued allegiance to Nikon. Low light shots were not an issue and the camera metering accurately captured a difficult subject without me having to manually compensate the exposure.