The Buildings of Manhattan with a Hasselblad and Kodak Tri-X 400 Film

Lately, using a dark orange filter on the front of my Hasselblad 501cm's lens, I've been fixated on photographing NYC buildings set against a deep blue sky. Using black and white film without a filter gives you an almost white or pale grey sky. However, I prefer a dark, grainy backdrop. These photographs capture the way I often see the buildings of Manhattan - dramatic, hulking, almost menacing (Gotham-like if you will). I've spent plenty of time shooting perfectly lined up landscape-type shots of NYC buildings and landmarks, but this series shows the city as a walker, looking up, experiences it. The skyscrapers aren't postcard-placed and level. They surprise you. Turn a corner and one is waiting - jagged and looming. Walk block to block and your view of them shifts. At first, they tower over you, tons of steel, stone, and glass, and it's hard to tell one from the next. Then, distance changes your perspective. From further away, you can see the tops of the buildings start to emerge; their familiar character fully exposed.

The Chrysler Building, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Chrysler Building, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film

375 Lexington Avenue and The Chrysler Building, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film 375 Lexington Avenue, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film.

One Madison Park, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film One Madison Park, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film

Park Avenue Apartments, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Park Avenue Apartments, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film

One Bryant Park, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film One Bryant Park, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film

New York by Gehry Building, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film New York by Gehry Building, NYC, Kodak Tri-X 400 Film

All shots taken with my Hasselblad 501cm camera and Zeiss lens (fitted with a dark orange filter) on Kodak Tri-X 400 film. Film home developed in Kodak Xtol 1:1 developer at 20C for 11.25 minutes.