The Standard Hotel, NYC, Shot with Hasselblad 501cm on Fuji Neopan Acros 100 Film

One Minute Exposure of The Standard Hotel, NYC, shot with Hasselblad 501cm on Fuji Neopan Acros 100 FilmLong Exposure of The Standard Hotel, NYC, Closer Shot, Fuji Neopan Acros 100, Hasselblad 501cm *clicking on photo will take you to a larger image.

I reunited with an old friend last night. For months, my Hasselblad has sat on a shelf, watching me play with the 8x10. In fact, I have only shot the Hasselblad twice since getting the 8x10 in working order. I've been more than a bit obsessed about getting everything right with the larger format, and as a result I had forgotten how much medium format film is the perfect sweet spot for photography. Medium format cameras are super portable and easy to carry around the city, yet MF negatives yield so much more information than 35mm negatives.

Last night when Kate and I were walking to the sub I remarked that my small bag and tiny carbon tripod (compared to my wooden Berlebach tripod for the 8x10) felt like I was carrying a point and shoot in my pocket after dragging around LF gear. But the Hasselblad is no point and shoot. It's a great camera that takes no time to set up and the results are fantastic.

I had been wanting to take a good 8x10 night shot of the Standard Hotel in the Meatpacking District, but hadn't really checked out which spots I wanted to shoot from. So rather than drag the 8x10 outfit over there and not find a nice angle, I decided to test it out with the smaller camera. Not too bad for test shots...

And moving just a bit further back I was able to get some nice headlight trails:

The Statndard Hotel, NYC, shot with Hasselblad 501cm on Fuji Neopan Acros 100 Film Long Exposure of The Standard Hotel in NYC, Fuji Neopan Acros 100 Film, Hasselblad 501cm *clicking on photo will take you to a larger image.

Oddly, I had to stop and think about developing times for 120 film after being so used to developing sheet film in trays. I developed the Acros 100 in HC 110 Solution B for at 20C for five minutes. I don't quite have the hang of scanning 120 film with the V700 however. This was the first roll of 120 film I scanned with the new scanner and it was a bit of a pain to align correctly.